• Overview

Mountain Gorilla Tracking Etiquette in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable national park and Mgahinga gorilla national park, and in Rwanda’s Volcanoes national park

Mountain gorillas share 98% of our DNA and as such are very susceptible to catching human infections, particularly respiratory ones, but they don’t have our immune system to deal with them – a common cold could eventually prove life-threatening.

Various rules for gorilla trekking are therefore in place to help protect these precious primates.
Only one group of tourists can visit the mountain gorillas each day and once you’ve found them, you’ll have just one precious hour in their company. If you have a cold, flu, or other contagious infection, you shouldn’t go gorilla trekking.

You should keep a distance of 7m from the gorillas, although of course the gorillas themselves are unaware of this and will often get very close, in which case you should try to move away.

When you’re with your group, you should try not to make sudden movements and to keep your voices low so that the group remains relaxed.

Although these mountain gorillas are now used to seeing people, do bear in mind that they are still wild animals and can sometimes react unexpectedly, so always heed your guide’s and trackers’ instructions.

You won’t be allowed to eat or drink when you’re with the gorillas.

Photography on a gorilla trekking safari – Gorilla Tracking Etiquette

If you’re a keen photographer, taking your own pictures of mountain gorillas is one of the most magical photo sessions you’ll ever experience. Do bear in mind that the light can be poor in the rainforest and that use of flash is not permitted. You might also need to protect your camera against heavy rain.